President Obama Urges Congress to Pass Energy and Climate Change Legislation that Places a Cost on Greenhouse Gas Emissions

Posted on January 28, 2010. Filed under: cap-and-trade | Tags: , , |

Carbon Traders and Clean-Tech Companies Heartened by State of the Union
By Joel Kirkland
ClimateWire
The New York Times
January 28, 2010

It was music to the ears of carbon traders and clean-energy company executives to hear President Obama urge Congress to pass energy and climate change legislation that places a cost on greenhouse gas emissions.

“To create more of these clean-energy jobs, we need more production, more efficiency, more incentives,” Obama proclaimed in his first State of the Union address.

“And yes,” he said, “it means passing a comprehensive energy and climate bill with incentives that will finally make clean energy the profitable kind of energy in America.”

Obama thanked the House for passing a bill in June, sponsored by Reps. Henry Waxman (D-Calif.) and Edward Markey (D-Mass.). At its core, that bill would create an economywide cap-and-trade program that ratchets down industrial carbon dioxide emissions over time by distributing a declining number of pollution permits to electric utilities and factories. Support in the Senate for cap and trade is much more tenuous, because of concern about the economic impact and the creation of an international commodity market for carbon allowances and offset contracts.

“This year, I am eager to help advance the bipartisan effort in the Senate,” Obama said.

Dirk Forrister, director of Natsource, a New York-based asset manager in carbon and renewable energy markets, said extending an olive branch to Republicans is critical to getting that bill passed out of the Senate, and Obama did just that.

‘A deal to be had on climate’
“He acknowledged the differences with the Republicans and said he’d work with them,” Forrister said after the speech. “So I took that as a real encouraging speech for climate and clean energy. There’s a deal to be had on climate if they can get past the partisanship.”

Forrister, former chairman of the White House Climate Change Task Force under President Clinton, and Henry Derwent, CEO of the Geneva-based International Emissions Trading Association (IETA), urged Obama to focus on passing a cap-and-trade scheme this year, rather than jettisoning the House approach for a less comprehensive energy bill. They called on Obama to “establish a clear timeline for passage of an economywide cap-and-trade bill.”

IETA represents some of the world’s largest investment banks and trading houses, most of which have carbon trading divisions poised to inject billions of dollars into a U.S. and European carbon emissions market.

The group asserts that a global financial trade in carbon credits, offset contracts and derivatives would fuel investment in clean-energy projects aimed at slashing global emissions. But it has long said it won’t happen unless Congress creates a U.S. market to buttress any global agreement on emissions reductions and financing programs for developing countries.

Obama placed energy and climate in the context of jobs, perhaps not suprisingly, given rising political pressure to turn his attention to bread-and-butter economic issues.

“I took it as a sign of real seriousness,” Forrister said.

Pitching a race to jobs and green technology
Obama emphasized an emerging race among the United States, China and Europe to capitalize on new clean-energy and battery technology to replace coal and oil, which dominate the world’s energy use.

“There is a race in the global theater,” Forrister said. “Folks in America don’t really like a defeatist attitude. They want a winning attitude.”

Ken Newcombe, CEO of C-Quest Capital, based in Washington, said the mere mention of “green jobs” should be a positive sign to the carbon trading and energy finance community.

“If he mentions green jobs, that’s talking big that he’ll continue on the climate security bill,” he said.

Before the speech, Newcombe warned that mentioning climate directly could complicate the political environment, but he said many investors are already convinced Obama is serious about the issue.

“The president turned up in Copenhagen and was singlehandedly responsible for getting accord out and breaking the deadlock,” he said. “That was a remarkable sign of his commitment.”

For his part, Obama also mentioned some items popular with the GOP: zero-emissions nuclear power plants, oil and gas drilling, biofuels and clean-coal technology.

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President Obama Voices Support for Biofuels Development and Continued Viability of Existing Ethanol Industry

Posted on June 15, 2009. Filed under: Advanced Biofuel, Blender's Tax Credit, Field-to-Pump | Tags: , , |

President Obama Voices Support for Biofuels Development and Continued Viability of Existing Ethanol Industry

GBC Asked to Contribute to Implementation of Presidential Biofuels Directive

 

 

WASHINGTON, June 1 /PRNewswire/ — In his effort to develop a national biofuels strategy to reduce America’s dependence on imported oil, President Barack Obama invited the Governors’ Biofuels Coalition to partner with key members of his Administration to achieve his vision for energy independence.

In a May 27, 2009, letter to Coalition Chair Gov. John Hoeven of North Dakota and Vice Chair Gov. Chet Culver of Iowa, President Obama praised the organization for its leadership in biofuels policy and public education. The President asked the Coalition to join him in implementing his Presidential Biofuels Directive, which was issued earlier this month. The directive outlined the President’s vision for biofuels development and his expectations for key cabinet and administration officials to lead the Administration’s biofuels initiatives. The President noted that the Coalition’s February 2009 recommendations helped form key points of the directive, and led to the President’s request for the Coalition to work with “members of my cabinet to implement the directive.”

In the letter, President Obama notes that his Administration is committed to the rapid development of cellulosic ethanol. “But this transition will be successful only if the first-generation biofuels industry remains viable in the near-term, and if we remove long-standing artificial barriers to market expansion…,” the letter states.

“We cannot achieve the promise of cellulosic biofuels if we do not continue to support and develop the first-generation corn ethanol industry and the infrastructure needed to distribute and deliver biofuels today and in the future,” said Governor Hoeven. “This is an endorsement for our continued commitment to the ethanol industry we have today, while moving forward with the development of emerging cellulosic biofuels technologies.”

“While the President’s acknowledgement of the Coalition’s leadership is certainly gratifying, we understand that there is both a great responsibility and a great challenge in helping the President implement his biofuels directive,” said Governor Culver. “The Coalition is up to the task. We are very honored, and look forward to working with the Administration to achieve the President’s vision for a transition from petroleum-derived transportation fuels to a sustainable, low carbon energy future.”

The President also noted the important economic development role that biofuels can play. “It is my hope that the Presidential Biofuels Directive will lead to new jobs, new businesses and reduce dependence on foreign oil,” he wrote.

“The governors in the Coalition have seen the profound and positive impact that first-generation biofuels are having on our state and local economies,” Governor Hoeven added. “They are the foundation for an even more robust and sustainable domestic energy industry that will enhance our nation’s economy and energy security.”

President Obama’s Letter to the Coalition can be viewed at:

 http://www.governorsbiofuelscoalition.org/

The Coalition’s Letter and Recommendations to President Obama can be viewed at: www.governorsbiofuelscoalition.org/assets/files/GBC_ObamaLetter1.pdf

For fifteen years, the Governors’ Biofuels Coalition has provided national leadership on biofuels issues. The Coalition’s policy activities address all biofuels, including ethanol, biodiesel, advanced biofuels, co-products, and technologies yet to come. For more information, visit www.GovernorsBiofuelsCoalition.org.


About Renergie

Renergie was formed by Ms. Meaghan M. Donovan on March 22, 2006 for the purpose of raising capital to develop, construct, own and operate a network of ten ethanol plants in the parishes of the State of Louisiana which were devastated by hurricanes Katrina and Rita.  Each ethanol plant will have a production capacity of five million gallons per year (5 MGY) of fuel-grade ethanol.  Renergie’s “field-to-pump” strategy is to produce non-corn ethanol locally and directly market non-corn ethanol locally. On February 26, 2008, Renergie was one of 8 recipients, selected from 139 grant applicants, to share $12.5 million from the Florida Department of Environmental Protection’s Renewable Energy Technologies Grants Program.  Renergie received $1,500,483 (partial funding) in grant money to design and build Florida’s first ethanol plant capable of producing fuel-grade ethanol solely from sweet sorghum juice. On  April 2, 2008, Enterprise Florida, Inc., the state’s economic development organization, selected Renergie as one of Florida’s most innovative technology companies in the alternative energy sector.  On January 20, 2009, Florida Energy & Climate Commission amended RET Grant Agreement S0386 to increase Renergie’s funding from $1,500,483 to $2,500,000. By blending fuel-grade ethanol with gasoline at the gas station pump, Renergie will offer the consumer a fuel that is renewable, more economical, cleaner, and more efficient than unleaded gasoline.  Moreover, the Renergie project will mark the first time that Louisiana farmers will share in the profits realized from the sale of value-added products made from their crops.

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President Obama Establishes Biofuels Interagency Working Group

Posted on May 8, 2009. Filed under: Advanced Biofuel, Field-to-Pump | Tags: , , , , |

President Obama Establishes Biofuels Interagency Working Group; Push on Biofuel Development/Commercialization and Flex-Fuel Vehicle Use

Green Car Congress

5 May 2009

US President Barack Obama has established a Biofuels Interagency Working Group, to be co-chaired by the Secretaries of Agriculture and Energy and the Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency, to further the research, development and commercialization of biofuels.

The announcement came in conjunction with the EPA’s release of its notice of proposed rulemaking for the Renewable Fuel Standard (earlier post), and the Department of Energy’s announcement of $787.5 million in funding to be awarded to advanced biofuels research and commercialization projects (earlier post).

The Biofuels Interagency Working Group will work with the National Science and Technology Council’s Biomass Research and Development Board in undertaking its work. The Working Group will:

  • Develop the US’ first comprehensive biofuel market development program, which shall use existing authorities and identify new policies to support the development of next-generation biofuels, increase flexible fuel vehicle use, and assist in retail marketing efforts;

  • Coordinate infrastructure policies impacting the supply, secure transport, and distribution of biofuels; and

  • Identify new policy options to promote the environmental sustainability of biofuels feedstock production, taking into consideration land use, habitat conservation, crop management practices, water efficiency and water quality, as well as lifecycle assessments of greenhouse gas emissions.

“We need to work in concert with the industry to figure out how to do a better job to create a market for biofuels, how to increase the use of flex-fuel vehicles, how we can assist those who market, and to coordinate the infrastructure, and do all this in a sustainable way. This is a very aggressive directive from the President.”

—Secretary Vilsack

President Obama directed Secretary Vilsack to expedite and increase production of and investment in biofuel development efforts by refinancing existing investments in renewable fuels to preserve jobs in ethanol and biodiesel plants, renewable electricity generation plants, and other supporting industries; and making renewable energy financing opportunities from the Food, Conservation and Energy Act of 2008 available within 30 days.

These opportunities include:

  • Loan guarantees for the development, construction, and retrofitting of commercial scale biorefineries and grants to help pay for the development and construction costs of demonstration-scale biorefineries;

  • Expedited funding to encourage biorefineries to replace the use of fossil fuels in plant operations by installing new biomass energy systems or producing new energy from renewable biomass;

  • Expedited funding to biofuels producers to encourage production of next-generation biofuels from biomass and other non-corn feedstocks;

  • Expansion of Renewable Energy Systems and Energy Efficiency Improvements Program, which has been renamed the Rural Energy for America Program, to include hydroelectric source technologies, energy audits, and higher loan guarantee limits; and

  • Guidance and support for collection, harvest, storage, and transportation assistance for eligible materials for use in biomass conversion facilities.

About Renergie

Renergie was formed by Ms. Meaghan M. Donovan on March 22, 2006 for the purpose of raising capital to develop, construct, own and operate a network of ten ethanol plants in the parishes of the State of Louisiana which were devastated by hurricanes Katrina and Rita. Each ethanol plant will have a production capacity of five million gallons per year (5 MGY) of fuel-grade ethanol. Renergie’s “field-to-pump” strategy is to produce non-corn ethanol locally and directly market non-corn ethanol locally. On February 26, 2008, Renergie was one of 8 recipients, selected from 139 grant applicants, to share $12.5 million from the Florida Department of Environmental Protection’s Renewable Energy Technologies Grants Program. Renergie received $1,500,483 (partial funding) in grant money to design and build Florida’s first ethanol plant capable of producing fuel-grade ethanol solely from sweet sorghum juice. On April 2, 2008, Enterprise Florida, Inc., the state’s economic development organization, selected Renergie as one of Florida’s most innovative technology companies in the alternative energy sector. On January 20, 2009, Florida Energy & Climate Commission amended RET Grant Agreement S0386 to increase Renergie’s funding from $1,500,483 to $2,500,000. By blending fuel-grade ethanol with gasoline at the gas station pump, Renergie will offer the consumer a fuel that is renewable, more economical, cleaner, and more efficient than unleaded gasoline. Moreover, the Renergie project will mark the first time that Louisiana farmers will share in the profits realized from the sale of value-added products made from their crops.

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White House to Step Up Ethanol Efforts

Posted on May 5, 2009. Filed under: Advanced Biofuel, Field-to-Pump | Tags: , , , , |

White House to Step Up Ethanol Efforts

By STEPHEN POWER

The Wall Street Journal

May 5, 2009

 

WASHINGTON — The Obama administration on Tuesday will step up efforts to increase the availability of ethanol at filling stations and to speed up subsidies to struggling biofuel producers. But the trade-off is that the administration is also expected to propose a rule that could make certain biofuels look less climate-friendly.

 

At a news conference led by the heads of the Agriculture Department, Energy Department and Environmental Protection Agency, the administration is expected to announce the creation of an interagency group that will be charged with forging a plan to encourage the production of more automobiles that can run on high-level ethanol blends, and increase the availability of high-level ethanol blends at gasoline stations.

 

President Barack Obama is also expected to direct the Agriculture Department to expedite the awarding of loan guarantees to support the development and construction of more biofuel refineries.

 

But at the same time, the EPA is expected to propose measuring the greenhouse-gas emissions associated with biofuel production — including emissions that result overseas when farmers world-wide respond to higher food prices by converting forest and grassland to cropland. The EPA decision could undercut the environmental rationale the ethanol industry has used to sustain support for its government subsidies.

 

In an effort to ease the sting of Tuesday’s announcement, the administration scheduled a news conference to discuss not only the EPA rulemaking but also what it called Mr. Obama’s “commitment to advance biofuels research and commercialization.”

 

The question of whether biofuels help or harm the climate has been heating up for months in scientific, corporate and environmental circles. A study published last year in the journal Science found that U.S. production of corn-based ethanol increases emissions by 93% compared with using gasoline, when expected world-wide land-use changes are taken into account.

 

Some scientists and many biofuel proponents have challenged the Science study, saying it relied on unrealistic assumptions. There is also disagreement among scientists and economists over how to measure the impact of land-use changes in one country on land-use changes in another.

 

“We’re ready to begin the debate” over how to measure ethanol’s environmental impact, said Matt Hartwig, a spokesman for the Renewable Fuels Association. “But let’s get it out there, so we can talk about it.”

 

The efforts by environmental regulators to assess biofuels’ impact on the environment comes at a difficult time for the ethanol industry. Demand for the corn-based fuel has been falling, as consumers have cut back on driving amid the economic crisis.

 

The plunge in oil prices from last summer’s record high, meanwhile, has pushed down ethanol prices and cut producers’ profits. Last month, an ethanol trade group petitioned the EPA to allow the ethanol levels in gasoline blends to be as high as 15%, up from the current 10%. Without the increase, the group said the U.S. won’t be able to meet a congressional mandate requiring some 36 billion gallons of renewable fuel to be blended into the domestic fuel supply by 2022.

 

About Renergie

Renergie was formed by Ms. Meaghan M. Donovan on March 22, 2006 for the purpose of raising capital to develop, construct, own and operate a network of ten ethanol plants in the parishes of the State of Louisiana which were devastated by hurricanes Katrina and Rita.  Each ethanol plant will have a production capacity of five million gallons per year (5 MGY) of fuel-grade ethanol.  Renergie’s “field-to-pump” strategy is to produce non-corn ethanol locally and directly market non-corn ethanol locally. On February 26, 2008, Renergie was one of 8 recipients, selected from 139 grant applicants, to share $12.5 million from the Florida Department of Environmental Protection’s Renewable Energy Technologies Grants Program.  Renergie received $1,500,483 (partial funding) in grant money to design and build Florida’s first ethanol plant capable of producing fuel-grade ethanol solely from sweet sorghum juice. On  April 2, 2008, Enterprise Florida, Inc., the state’s economic development organization, selected Renergie as one of Florida’s most innovative technology companies in the alternative energy sector.  On January 20, 2009, Florida Energy & Climate Commission amended RET Grant Agreement S0386 to increase Renergie’s funding from $1,500,483 to $2,500,000. By blending fuel-grade ethanol with gasoline at the gas station pump, Renergie will offer the consumer a fuel that is renewable, more economical, cleaner, and more efficient than unleaded gasoline.  Moreover, the Renergie project will mark the first time that Louisiana farmers will share in the profits realized from the sale of value-added products made from their crops.

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EPA Now Determining Whether Ethanol Good or Bad for Global Warming? Big Test Case for Obama

Posted on May 4, 2009. Filed under: Field-to-Pump | Tags: , , , , , |

EPA now determining whether ethanol good or bad for global warming? Big test case for Obama

H. JOSEF HEBERT | Associated Press Writer

http://www.newsday.com

May 3, 2009

 

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama’s commitment to take on climate change and put science over politics is about to be tested as his administration faces a politically sensitive question about the widespread use of ethanol: Does it help or hurt the fight against global warming?

The Environmental Protection Agency is close to proposing ethanol standards. But two years ago, when Congress ordered a huge increase in ethanol use, lawmakers also told the agency to show that ethanol would produce less pollution linked to global warming than would gasoline.

So how will the EPA define greenhouse gas emissions from ethanol production and use? Given the political clout of farm interests, will the science conflict with the politics?

Environmentalists, citing various studies and scientific papers, say the agency must factor in more than just the direct, heat-trapping pollution from ethanol and its production. They also point to “indirect” impacts on global warming from worldwide changes in land use, including climate-threatening deforestation, as land is cleared to plant corn or other ethanol crops.

Ethanol manufacturers and agriculture interests contend the fallout from potential land use changes in the future, especially those outside the United States, have not been adequately proven or even quantified, and should not count when the EPA calculates ethanol’s climate impact.

“It defies common sense that EPA would publish a proposed rule-making with harmful conclusions for biofuels based on incomplete science and inaccurate assumptions,” complained Sen. Charles Grassley, R-Iowa.

He was one of 12 farm-state senators, both Democrats and Republicans, who wrote EPA Administrator Lisa Jackson in March, urging the agency to stick to assessing only the direct emissions.

Ethanol, which in the future may come from cellulosic sources such as switchgrass and wood chips, is promoted by its advocates as a “green” substitute for gasoline that will help the U.S. reduce its reliance on fossil fuels, especially foreign oil. That transition is a priority of the Obama White House.

In 2007, Congress ordered huge increases in ethanol use, requiring refiners to blend 20 billion gallons with gasoline by 2015 and a further expansion to 36 billion gallons a year by 2022.

Congress said any fuel produced in plants built after 2007 must emit 20 percent less in greenhouse gases than gasoline if it comes from corn, and 60 percent less if from cellulosic crops.

Meeting the direct emissions would not be a problem. But if indirect emissions from expected land use changes are included, ethanol probably would fail the test.

Nathaniel Greene, director of renewable energy policy at the Natural Resources Defense Council, an environmental advocacy group, said that wouldn’t mean the end of ethanol.

Ethanol from existing production facilities is grandfathered and “there are ways to produce advanced ethanol’s that would comply with the greenhouse thresholds,” even using land use climate impacts if the industry chose to adopt them, Greene said.

But farm interests and their allies in Congress are pushing to get the EPA to at least postpone any consideration of the land-use impacts issue, arguing the science surrounding the issue is uncertain.

The senators’ letter said that an overreaching regulation by EPA on ethanol’s link to climate change “could seriously harm our U.S. biofuels growth strategy by introducing uncertainty and discouraging future investments.”

Environmentalists say there have been enough studies on the indirect impact of ethanol on greenhouse pollution to justify the science.

Ignoring the indirect impacts “will undermine the environmental benefits” of the renewable fuels program “and set a poor precedent for any future policies attempting to reduce global warming pollution,” 17 environmental group wrote Jackson in response to the senator’s plea.

Greene said the EPA’s handling of the ethanol rule will be a “a test of our ability to follow sound science” even when it conflicts with the interests of powerful interests.

The environmental organizations noted that Obama has “vowed to make the U.S. a leader on climate change” and put science over politics, and “now is the time to uphold those pledges.”

EPA spokeswoman Andora Andy declined to say when an agency proposal — a holdover issue from the Bush administration — would be issued. Interest groups on both sides of the debate said it could come in days. The White House Office of Management and Budget concluded its review of the EPA proposal last week.

___

On the Net:

Environmental Protection Agency: http://www.epa.gov

Senators’ letter: http://tinyurl.com/cwd69f

Natural Resources Defense Council: http://www.nrdc.org/

 

About Renergie                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 Renergie was formed by Ms. Meaghan M. Donovan on March 22, 2006 for the purpose of raising capital to develop, construct, own and operate a network of ten ethanol plants in the parishes of the State of Louisiana which were devastated by hurricanes Katrina and Rita.  Each ethanol plant will have a production capacity of five million gallons per year (5 MGY) of fuel-grade ethanol.  Renergie’s “field-to-pump” strategy is to produce non-corn ethanol locally and directly market non-corn ethanol locally. On February 26, 2008, Renergie was one of 8 recipients, selected from 139 grant applicants, to share $12.5 million from the Florida Department of Environmental Protection’s Renewable Energy Technologies Grants Program.  Renergie received $1,500,483 (partial funding) in grant money to design and build Florida’s first ethanol plant capable of producing fuel-grade ethanol solely from sweet sorghum juice. On  April 2, 2008, Enterprise Florida, Inc., the state’s economic development organization, selected Renergie as one of Florida’s most innovative technology companies in the alternative energy sector.  On January 20, 2009, Florida Energy & Climate Commission amended RET Grant Agreement S0386 to increase Renergie’s funding from $1,500,483 to $2,500,000. By blending fuel-grade ethanol with gasoline at the gas station pump, Renergie will offer the consumer a fuel that is renewable, more economical, cleaner, and more efficient than unleaded gasoline.  Moreover, the Renergie project will mark the first time that Louisiana farmers will share in the profits realized from the sale of value-added products made from their crops.

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Obama Administration Launches Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E)

Posted on April 29, 2009. Filed under: Advanced Biofuel, Field-to-Pump | Tags: , , , |

Obama Administration launches Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E), establishes offshore renewables development framework

By Jim Lane

Biofuels Digest

April 29, 2009

 

 

Major announcements came from Washington regarding new advanced projects energy research funding and rules for offshore development.

 

The Administration announced the launch of the Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E), modeled after the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), which was authorized by Congress in 2007 and funded through the $400 million from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act.

 

ARPA-E will develop new energy technologies that offer significant progress toward reducing imported energy; reducing energy-related emissions, including greenhouse gases; and improving energy efficiency. DOE will offer individual awards of $500,000 to $20 million based on eight-page “concept papers” that briefly outline the technical concept, which would lead to grants, cooperative agreements, or Technology Investment Agreements, with the latter two most likely because of the need for substantial interaction between ARPA-E and the awardees. Concept papers can be submitted to DOE from May 12 through June 2. The full solicitation is here with a reference number DE-FOA-0000065.

 

Finally, the Administration established a framework for development of renewable energy projects on the US outer continental shelf.

 

 

 

About Renergie

Renergie was formed by Ms. Meaghan M. Donovan on March 22, 2006 for the purpose of raising capital to develop, construct, own and operate a network of ten ethanol plants in the parishes of the State of Louisiana which were devastated by hurricanes Katrina and Rita.  Each ethanol plant will have a production capacity of five million gallons per year (5 MGY) of fuel-grade ethanol.  Renergie’s “field-to-pump” strategy is to produce non-corn ethanol locally and directly market non-corn ethanol locally. On February 26, 2008, Renergie was one of 8 recipients, selected from 139 grant applicants, to share $12.5 million from the Florida Department of Environmental Protection’s Renewable Energy Technologies Grants Program.  Renergie received $1,500,483 (partial funding) in grant money to design and build Florida’s first ethanol plant capable of producing fuel-grade ethanol solely from sweet sorghum juice. On  April 2, 2008, Enterprise Florida, Inc., the state’s economic development organization, selected Renergie as one of Florida’s most innovative technology companies in the alternative energy sector.  On January 20, 2009, Florida Energy & Climate Commission amended RET Grant Agreement S0386 to increase Renergie’s funding from $1,500,483 to $2,500,000. By blending fuel-grade ethanol with gasoline at the gas station pump, Renergie will offer the consumer a fuel that is renewable, more economical, cleaner, and more efficient than unleaded gasoline.  Moreover, the Renergie project will mark the first time that Louisiana farmers will share in the profits realized from the sale of value-added products made from their crops.

 

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    About

    Renergie created “field-to-pump," a unique strategy to locally produce and market advanced biofuel (“non-corn fuel ethanol”) via a network of small advanced biofuel manufacturing facilities. The purpose of “field-to-pump” is to maximize rural development and job creation while minimizing feedstock supply risk and the burden on local water supplies.

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